FAQ

  1. What is an ILP?
  2. What do ILPs do?
  3. Can anyone become an ILP?
  4. Are ILPs paid for the support they provide?
  5. How can I become an ILP and how long is the process?
  6. What kinds of client support would be my responsibility as an ILP?
  7. How long does the matching process take?
  8. Would I be matched with a person of the same or opposite gender?
  9. Who would I call if I had an issue or needed help?
  10. Would the person who lived with me need constant supervision?
  11. How long would my commitment need to be?
  12. How many people can I (or my family) have living with me (us) at one time?
  13. Would the person who lived with me have other family members involved in his or her life?
  14. Would I be able to take a vacation? What if I needed to go out of town or had a family emergency?
  15. What would the individual do during the day?
  16. Could I have a job and still be an ILP?
  17. What if the person who lived with me gets home earlier than I do?
  18. Would I be responsible for transportation?

 

  1. What is an ILP?
    As part of the DDRC’s commitment to strengthening communities by including people of all abilities, ILPs (Integrated Living Practitioners) support adults with developmental disabilities to live more independent lives. The ILP lives with a client – in the ILP’s home or in the client’s home – supporting them to achieve their annual goals and to enjoy the best possible quality of life as part of a family and the neighbourhood in which they live.

  2. What do ILPs do?
    Each ILP provides individualized support designed to meet the specific needs of the client who lives with them. The rigorous matching process at the DDRC carefully considers the needs and preferences of both ILPs and clients to ensure a successful, meaningful experience for everyone.

  3. Can anyone become an ILP?
    ILPs are as varied as the clients they support. They can be male or female, married or single, with or without families and of any ethnicity, culture or religion. However, the single most important characteristic they share is their commitment to supporting a client to grow and to live more independently.

  4. Are ILPs paid for the support they provide?
    Yes, ILPs are paid for their support. The amount for each ILP varies depending upon the individual needs of the clients they support. A key component of the matching process is to identify the level of client needs each ILP is able and willing to support.

  5. How can I become an ILP and how long is the process?
    After reviewing the information on this site, you are welcome to complete the application form found in the Apply section. Once your application and references are received, a representative from the DDRC will contact you to set up a meeting in your home to meet with you and answer any questions you may have.

    The length of time that it takes will depend on several factors: how quickly the DDRC receives your information; how quickly you are able to complete mandatory training; and when we have the right client match. It is important to remember that ILPs can depend on our experienced and knowledgeable staff to provide support and guidance at every step along the way.

  6. What kinds of client support would be my responsibility as an ILP?
    ILPs are responsible for providing basic daily living support and working with clients on achieving their goals. Typical daily living supports include providing nutritious meals and doing laundry; getting the client to appointments and community activities; and providing any necessary supervision. ILPs are also responsible for documentation of the supports being provided, including incident reporting. The DDRC team supports ILPs to ensure they have the information and resources needed to ensure a positive, successful shared living experience.

  7. How long does the matching process take?
    The matching process begins once you have been accepted into the ILS program. The length of this process will vary for each applicant; at times it can take several months to find the right match. However, it is worth the wait to ensure that you are your roommate are paired well.

  8. Would I be matched with a person of the same or opposite gender?
    It is incredibly important to us that both you and your roommate are happy with your living arrangements. For this reason, you may choose whether you would be more comfortable living with a person of the same or opposite gender.

  9. Who would I call if I had an issue or needed help?
    You would have access to an ILS Team Leader and other DDRC staff members. You would also be provided with referrals to other community organizations and resources depending on the needs and goals of your roommate.

  10. Would the person who lived with me need constant supervision?
    We serve a wide variety of individuals, some of whom require more supervision than others. We will be taking into account your comfort level, lifestyle and preferences to ensure the best fit for both you and your roommate.

  11. How long would my commitment need to be?
    While we hope that a relationship will last a long time, a 12-month commitment is required at the onset. Each placement begins with a three-month probationary period to ensure the match is positive for both parties.

  12. How many people can I (or my family) have living with me (us) at one time?
    ILPs can support one or two people at a time, and each person must have his or her own bedroom. It is recommended that an ILP starts by supporting just one client until they are comfortable with the living arrangement and the support requirements.

  13. Would the person who lived with me have other family members involved in his or her life?
    This will vary for each individual. If your application is successful, you will have the opportunity to indicate the level of family involvement that you are most comfortable with.

  14. Would I be able to take a vacation? What if I needed to go out of town or had a family emergency?
    Your ILS Team Leader will work with you to develop a support plan to help you plan for times you are away; they will also provide support in emergency situations and ensure that necessary arrangements are made.

  15. What would the individual do during the day?
    Many of our clients are employed, do volunteer work or attend programming during the day. You will only be matched with an individual whose lifestyle or daily routine is compatible with yours.

  16. Could I have a job and still be an ILP?
    Yes, ILPs are encouraged to have some other source of income unless they choose to make this work their vocation. See our Get Involved section to learn more about the guidelines.

  17. What if the person who lived with me gets home earlier than I do?
    All of this information is taken in to account during the matching process. However, having a certified back-up support person can help to ensure support is provided even at times when you cannot be present.

  18. Would I be responsible for transportation?
    Your support plan would outline transportation responsibilities and expectations. However, in emergency situations, it is the ILP’s responsibility to ensure that the individual receives the care they need, which may involve getting them to a doctor or hospital.
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